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Saturday, December 05, 2020

American Tree Sparrow, Winter Beauty

American Tree Sparrow, from a few days ago. There are two at the feeder this morning, chowing down before the snowstorm. These beautiful sparrows breed in the far north and come down into much of the U.S. for winter. (Nikon p950 superzoom camera, on "birdwatching" mode, photo untouched).

 

Wednesday, December 02, 2020

Pine Grosbeaks, Beautiful Northern Finches, Are Here!





Finally found Pine Grosbeaks recently after searching for Common Redpolls, White-winged Crossbills and other irruptive finches all day. They were eating crabapples in a parking lot and very undisturbed by people going to their cars. Such pretty birds. In the flock of 17, I saw no adult males. Adult females and male and female first year birds look similar. Pine Grosbeaks are part of this super year for irruptive finches. They come down into the U.S. from their far northern range of mainly Canada and AK and a few northern states when their food supply there is low. Look for them at good fruit sources.

 

Monday, November 23, 2020

Famous Barred Owl

 

If you haven't yet heard of Barry the Barred Owl, the celebrity bird now in Central Park, you soon will. This Barred Owl is one I photographed from my car so as not to disturb the owl, who was sitting on a signpost by the side of the road. Owls fascinate people and having attention focused on one can inspire and educate people, a good thing. Getting too close to photograph one and thereby disturbing it, especially if it is trying to hunt for survival, is not a good thing.


Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Snow Buntings Are Coming!

Snow Buntings




Now this is the kind of snow I might be ready for. Snow Buntings are being seen in NH, especially on the coast. These beautiful small birds breed way up there in Alaska and the Arctic on tundra and rocky slopes. They winter across much of the upper one-third of the U.S, and southern Canada on weedy fields and shores. In summer, the buffy feather edges wear off, revealing the breeding plumage which is more black-and-white especially in males. The eBird map shows where they are now. A few days ago in dense fog rising from the pond, I thought I may have seen a flock across our big field, but just couldn't get a good enough confirming look, don't you hate that when it happens? However, now I am on the lookout, you should be too. (photos from another time on the NH coast)

Friday, November 13, 2020

Project FeederWatch

 


Fun winter project! Participate in Project FeederWatch from Cornell which starts this weekend. Count birds at your feeders for science.
Join now!



Thursday, November 12, 2020

White-winged Dove, surprise in NH!!


There's a White-winged Dove being seen at bird feeders near an industrial park in Concord, NH! Usually found in the Southwest and Southeast this Mourning Dove look-alike can be told by the white edge of its folded wings. In the Southwest it is a resident of arid areas, while in the Gulf states it is common in landscaped suburbs and parklands and regularly visits bird feeders. So even if you are not in those areas, check closely your Mourning Doves, one could turn out to be a White-winged Dove! (photo from another time)